All posts by Washington Journal of Law, Technology & Arts

University of Washington School of Law

Pay-to-Play for Sovereign Immunity? A New Strategy Employed by Drug Patent Holders

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By Seth Parent

In May the Supreme Court decided TC Heartland, requiring patent infringement claims be brought where the defendant either “resides” or has an “established place of business” (rather than in the notoriously patent-holder friendly Eastern District of Texas). This change has led patent-holding companies to search for new strategies to increase the efficiency of their business model, and in turn, their profits.

These patent-holding companies, or “patent trolls,” as they are often referred to, may have just unveiled one such strategy. Following news of Allergan’s announcement that it was transferring title of six different pharmaceutical patents to the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe in September, patent holding company SRC Labs has now elected to pursue a similar strategy. Not only did these deals transfer the patents to the St. Regis tribe, they also provided the tribe with several million dollars upfront in addition to several million per annum. Read More

University of Washington School of Law

Kill Quill: Volume 2

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By Michael Rebagliati

2017 ended with a legislative bang as Congressional Republicans (rapidly) passed the most sweeping overhaul of the tax code in a generation. For many tax lawyers, 2018 has begun with a whimper as they scramble to understand what this means for their clients.

And yet, another major change to U.S. tax law still looms on the policy horizon. But this time, the change is coming not from Congress, but from the Supreme Court. On January 12th, the Supreme Court granted certiorari in the case of South Dakota v. Wayfair, Inc. Read More

University of Washington School of Law

Hollywood’s Darkest Secret: How Hollywood Employs Non-Disclosure Agreements and Confidentiality Clauses to Silence Sexual Assault Victims

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By Alex Palumbo

Few disagree that 2017 became a defining “watershed” moment in the national conversation and spurred awareness of the stories and experiences of sexual assault victims. Few industries were left unaffected by this conversation by the year’s end, including the realms of politics, arts, cable news, morning news, and corporate America. Victims came forward in numbers neither seen nor heard before. As with any situation where previously hidden stories come to light, questions arise. How have we never heard these stories before? How long have the victims lived in silence? How were the perpetrators able to keep living their lives and abusing more victims? This article examines that final question specifically. How did these perpetrators continue their patterns of abuse—silencing their victims while continuing to live freely?

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University of Washington School of Law

Cryptocurrencies, Tulips, and Regulation?

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By Evan Fowler

Almost 400 years ago the Dutch were really excited about tulips. In a period of three years, a tulip bulb went from a reasonable value to as much as six times the average person’s annual salary. Today we look at Dutch people selling their homes to buy tulips as crazy (we literally call that bubble “Tulip Mania”). Yet, right now we are watching South Koreans sell their homes to buy a digital “currency” – Bitcoin. Read More

University of Washington School of Law

Washington Officials Seek to Keep Net Neutral Despite FCC Repeal

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By Wiley Cason

In response to the repeal of Federal Net Neutrality rules, Washington State’s governor and attorney general have both argued that state-level regulations may still prevent Internet service providers (ISPs) from discriminating amongst data offered on their networks.

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